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assist in japan after the huge earthquake and tsunami. >>> also, conflicting reports on a possible nuclear meltdown there. what's actually happening? >>> all of this causing a sizeable economic impact in japan, the u.s. and beyond. you're in the cnn news room. i'm fredricka witfield. we'll get to all of those angles in japan and beyond. but first, a look at some other top stories. in the middle east, yemeni security forces fired guns and tear gas at protesters outside sanaa university today. at least 110 people were hurt. protesters are angry over high unemployment and what they see as government corruption and a lack of political freedom. >>> two men with ties to egypt's former leader have been arrested for orchestrating this assault on protesters in cairo's tahrir square. armed attackers charged through the crowd on horses and camels last month. nine days later, hosni mubarak was overthrown. >>> and in the u.s., new york police and the ntsb are investigating a bus crash that killed 14 people. there are conflicting reports about what caused the bus to flip and swerve into a pole y
liberty mutual insurance. >> shepard: good afternoon. 5:00 in new york. 7:00 a.m. in tokyo, japan. i'm shepard smith and this is fox news continuing coverage of the aftermath, one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded, including new information about radiation levels near the country's nuclear power plant or inside one. and new reports of damage in the state of california. but first -- >> shepard: this was part of the scene in japan when the 8.9 magnitude quake struck in the middle of the afternoon. a quarter to 3:00 in the afternoon on friday. the quake is nearly 8,000 times stronger than the one which devastated new zealand weeks ago. hundreds of aftershocks across japan have followed. so did a towering tsunami. with walls of water as high as 30 feet. four complete trains are now missing along the coast, train services are now suspended across much of the nation, stranding millions of commuters in the japanese capital. a ship carrying 100 people was swept away. thousands of homes are destroyed. even an airport is under water. hundreds are reported dead. hundreds even thousand
, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. this morning, the situation at japan's crippled fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant has gone from critical to desperate. the plant has suffered severe damage and so far, efforts to gain control have failed. here's the latest. a surge in radiation levels forced the remaining workers at the plant to temporarily withdraw. early this morning, a second fire broke out at reactor number four. this one may involve the outer shell of the containment building. and japanese officials also say the outer containment building of another reactor may have been compromised. charlie d'agata is in takasaki japan with more this morning. he joins us. good morning, charlie, what's the latest there? >> good morning to you, betty. the latest is, thankfully, the fire is out, and the plant's operators said they've been able to stabilize the temperature and the pressure in that critical unit. the reactor has gone -- at the same time the japanese government said it's now time to ask the military for help. efforts to prevent a full-blown nuclear disaster suf
comments@captioncolorado.com >> couric: tonight, emergency workers return to japan's crippled nuclear plant after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but
in japan's history an emperor gone on television to address a national crisis. the emperor akihito told the japanese people not to lose hope three reactors damaged at the plants. this is a view up above. that is reactor three on the left-hand side of your screen and reactor four in the middle. if you can determine that. radiation levels surged after that white cloud of smoke was seen coming from reactor three. the fear there is a crack in the steel and concrete shell that insulates radioactive material as cnn stan grant tells us, even nuclear experts are stumped by this white cloud. >> they are looking into exactly what has caused that and they are still working on whether this consumption vessel that surrounds the core of the nuclear reactor holding in the more nasty radioactive substances has, in fact, than breached. this is an ongoing concern. they have assumptions about what is happening but they can't get in and have a look at it. remember, as well, the work is from the plant today workers from the plant today were forced to evacuate themselves and after a fire in the reactor numbe
crowley in washington. stay tuned to cnn for much more coverage of the disaster in japan. up next, "fareed zakaria gps." >> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world? i'm fareed zakaria. i'll give you my take on the tragic devastation in japan. but first, here is the latest. the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami. japan's prime minister says his country is grappling with its worst crisis since world war ii. it's a race against time for rescue workers. the official death toll now stands at more than 1,200. but it will rise. one regional official says the deaths in his area alone were undoubtedly in the tens of thousands. 200,000 people living near a nuclear power plant in fukushima have been evacuated. there was explosion in a reactor yet and there are fears that there he will will be another explosion at a different reactor at the same plant. the world is trying to help out. the u.s.s. ronald reagan arrived off the coast on sunday and made dozens of trips delivering aid. meanwhile, more video is emerging of the sheer scale
the biggest earthquake and tsunami in japan. aftershocks are a given, but the latest jolt with the preliminary magnitude of 6.4 was apparently not an aftershock at all but a new earthquake in its own right. the quake on friday and most of the tremors since have been northeast of the capital. that's where the loss, the devastation, they're simply too much to bear. the official death toll stands at 3,373 with more than twice that number officially listed as missing. the real numbers are unknown, certainly much higher. here's a more solid number for you. 91, that's the latest count of countries big and small offering some kind of help, according to japan's foreign ministry. through it all the most immediate crisis is the fukushima daichi nuclear plant. all three reactors that were online at the time of the quake have endured explosions in the building that housed them. earlier today a fire broke out in a building that houses a fourth reactor and the radiation went into the atmosphere. the fire is out now. the government says radiation levels at the plant are no longer harmful to human health. tha
jones industrial average was up 150 points on signs japan could be getting the upper hand and he cuts it down to size and the news breaks he is saying he will threaten his people and then trade is fighting out, some cutting out, and others back in, so it finishes up 160 points so they dismiss the crazy guy for now. if you needed the prove, the forces are alive and well at wall and broad. but who wins? the one trying to contain the nuclear menace or the other being a many nasa. and what do you say? >>guest: we are at a crossroads and we are in a global economy. it is amazing 24 slash -- 24/7, and everyone is happy with the nuclear contains and muammar qaddafi comes out and stocks fall apart so we don't know from minute to minute or day-to-day the next headline and it makes it difficult to ride the roller coaster. >>neil: global events dictate the market. will that be the rule for a while? >>guest: it will be the rule for a long time. the foreseeable future. the two events we are talking about, were unforeseen. we were not thinking libya would fall apart six months ago or for see we hav
the will and the determination to come back after something like this, it is japan. and we'd like to encourage you to help them. they need it. we've made it really easy for you. just go to our web page cnn.com/impact. >>> and now it's time for me to pass it over to brooke baldwin. brooke, you can't help but want to help these people when you look at these images? >> absolutely. cnn.com/impact. thank you, randi. >>> i want to begin this newscast today with an image i cannot shake. an entire village wiped out in 90 seconds. 90 seconds for the ocean to swell and overtake this one town while those who live there, those who had moved quickly enough, watched from higher ground. watch this with me. >> doesn't that just take your breath away? imagine you're one of the fortunate perched atop this hill watching your home, your town, people scrambling in the bottom left watching it all being wiped away. that was friday in miyagi prefecture. the twin forces in that tsunami were just the beginning. look at this. we have the satellite photo from digital globe and it shows the damage to the reactors at the fukushima daiichi
fan at the same time. we're also on japan and the guy who knows all important about how japan is to the financial world. joe brown, giant at ubs. the former democratic governor of virginia, doug wilder. this weekend, world coming back from the brink. we're here live saturday. >> glenn: hello, america. i want to welcome you to the "glenn beck program" and tell you tonight i'm going to lay out a theory. i have a lot of facts but i want to separate from facts from theory and you have to help figure this out. something is very wrong. it has been a busy couple of weeks for the president. there is a lot going on in the world. his job to lead the free world. what is he doing? he just carted his 60th round of golf as president. who hasn't golfed at least 60 times in the last two years? then, of course, the ncaa brackets. there is always a crisis. march madness is only once a year. today is st. patty's day. president went to capitol hill to celebrate that with congressional leaders. tomorrow, it's off for a well-deserved vacation in beautiful rio de janeiro. wow! may i just ask is he b
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
>>> on the broadcast tonight, the desperate measures under way to get the nuclear crisis in japan under control. >>> and president obama tells americans there's no threat from radiation coming across the pacific. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> a special good evening to our viewers joining us in the west. while the japanese deal with a staggering humanitarian crisis, they are now engaging in a last-resort effort to stop perhaps multiple meltdowns at nuclear reactors. and today president obama had to reassure the american public especially those along the west coast, that these fears of some sort of radioactive cloud coming across the pacific just aren't true. here now the latest on the disaster in japan. desperate measures now under way to lessen the nuclear disaster. while tonight japanese officials are saying they have rare good news of some levels stabilizing, late today we got the first look at the reactors close up. this new video of a helicopter fly-over showing the destruction. then there are the numbers. just under 5700 dead, ju
. "morning joe" starts right now. >> this is an international tragedy and although japan is a highly advanced economy and technologically equipped to rebuild, at this moment of crisis, it's important all of us join together in providing any help and assistance that we can in the days and months to come. >>> good morning. it is tuesday, march 15th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set here in washington, msnbc political analyst, pat buchanan. also the washington correspondent for bbc world news america, catty kay, and former white house chief of staff of president george w. bush, andy card in the studio with us this morning. >> we will show some of the headlines just to show -- >> big ones. >> what a big story this is. catty, you lived in japan over three years. give us your insight on some images we are seeing. >> i was there for the kobe earthquake that was in 1995. we are all focused on the nuclear crisis. all of those families who have lost somebody, lost parents, you're hearing the japanese talking in muted ways about their loss. but for japanese, who find expressing emotion in public
kneejerk reactions that didn't seem to take into account the new nuances of the crisis japan is experiencing. the fact is that the idea of more nuclear energy was just starting to gain ground in the united states, given the interest in clean, abundant and cheap energy. that nuclear renaissance in america is now in danger. right now one-fifth of america's electricity comes from 104 nuclear reactors. they're expensive. companies were loathed to build them, given the tangle of regulations so the federal government offered loan guarantees to get operators to invest their money. president obama is asking for $36 billion for nuclear power in this year's proposed budget. 12 applications right now for construction and licenses. but real safety issues during unforeseen catastrophic events like what happened in japan will have to be addressed by the industry. we still need alternatives to oil and coal, but we'll have to see whether more nuclear generated electricity is part of our future. that's it for me now. brooke baldwin takes over with "newsroom". >>> we are going to take you to l
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
yesterday who is writing about that. >> no doubt about it. first, obviously, the big news out of japan. we why don't we get the latest. >> we are talking about the fifth strongest earthquake on record since 1900. hawaii and other parts of the pacific are bracing for a destructive tsunami triggered by an 8.9 earthquake out of japan. it shows a massive 23-foot wall of watter that swept boats, cars, buildings and tons of debris inland. 32 people have now died in the quake. a figure that is expected to rise. a tsunami warning is now in place for the entire u.s. west coast. that means coastal communities in washington, oregon, california and southern alaska should be on alert and prepared for possible evacuation. a warning is also in place for hawaii, which was struck by a smaller 4.5 earthquake earlier today. now, there are no immediate reports of injuries or damage in hawaii but the state is bracing for the first waves from the tsunami which are expected to hit at 8:00 a.m. eastern time this morning. now, ahead of that, tsunami sirens were sounded and coastal areas are being evacuated. fires
on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and toda
>>> right now on "andrea mitchell reports," president obama promising full support to japan as it tries to avert nuclear disaster and cope with the unfolding humanitarian crisis in wake of friday's deadly quake. this hour, can a nuclear meltdown be avoided? engineers are more troubled today than ever about that crippled nuclear react or. we talk with congressman ed markey sounding the alarm for stricter safeguards. >>> experts say the big one is coming to california. are the officials there ready. >>> in libya gadhafi forces expand strikes against rebels on the front. secretary of state hillary clinton arrives in paris to talk with european counterparts about imposing a no-fly zone. >>> labor fight. is the challenge over bargaining rights about to head to court? >>> i'm norah o'donnell live in washington. andrea is on assignment. we begin in japan where the humanitarian disaster is compounded by the potential for a nuclear nightmare. 250,000 doses of iodine are being distributed to evacuees as a defense to radiation. it follows explosions at two nuclear reactors, a third is
in that country. stocks continue to teeter, could japan's economy cause the u.s. to stumble? we'll look into that. moments ago, a new after shock described by our msnbc team in tokyo as huge and lasting a long time here, we'll hear from chris jansing on that in a home. the threat of a nuclear catastrophe still surrounds japan and a cloud of fear here. the world is watching closely those nuclear reactors at the fukushima plant. 50 workers were ordered out when things got dicey. now they're going back in at great personal risk to try and figure out how to get a handle on things. fires, explosions, and radiation leaks remain a constant threat. it seems no one can predict how this situation will end. the u.s. army trying to ramp up its humanitarian effort to help the people of japan. more than 10,000 people already listed missing or dead. half a million have been evacuated and the cost of the destruction could top $100 billion. the sato family was lucky enough to survive. but when they were returned to their neighborhood, they found there is nothing left for them, their entire town is destroyed, gone
in libya. also breaking news on the deteriorating situation in japan. so welcome, once again, to "american morning." it's been a week now since all of this happened. the tsunami, the earthquake, the number of dead in japan continuing to rise as hopes fade of finding any more survivors amid the rubble. in the meantime, the radiation concerns are spreading, as well. crews are now desperately trying to cool down fuel at one nuclear reactor. the number of dead has climbed to 6,500 people. and the search grows more frantic with 10,000 people still missing. >>> turning to fast-moving developments in libya, stopping gadhafi. britain, france, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be ta
and thousands more may still be buried and japan's economy is reeling. overnight the nikkei index has lost 10% of its value. since this time yesterday. explosions, fires, a possible meltdown in several of the reactors. even nuclear experts say this crisis is rapidly descending into unchartered territory. we are joined by stan grant in tokyo. what is going on now, stan? what exactly is the japanese government saying? >> reporter: carol, this takes twists and turns almost by the hour, let alone by the day. let me focus in on two things that occurred today. an explosion in the number two reactor. there are concerns this may have caused some damage to the containment vessel and that is important in the case of a full meltdown because that is the last line of defense in keeping in the nastier radiation inside the plant and not seeping into the atmosphere. a fire then in reactor number four. what appears to have happened in this disabled reactor so much heat generated that a pool of water in which there was spent fuel rods evaporated. the fuel rods according to an trs company here may have ignited
>> mitchell: tonight, disaster in japan. the death toll soars as rescuers struggle to get water, food and power to the survivors of friday's massive earthquake and devastating tsunami. i'm russ mitchell. also tonight, nuclear fears. as quake damaged reactors threaten to overheat, workers are struggling to contain the threat of multiple meltdowns. flooding across large parts of the u.s. force some residents out of their homes and on to higher ground. and pushed out. the state department spokesman quits after causing the treatment of the suspected wikileaks leaker ridiculous. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. we are getting a clearer picture of the death and devastation in japan caused by friday's massive earthquake and tsunami. here's the latest. japan has now upgraded the quake to a magnitude 9. more than 1400 people are confirmed dead, with fears the toll could surge past 10,000. authorities say there is a risk of another nuclear reactor explosion, but u.s. officials say there is no radiation threat to
the coverage of what's happening in japan is wolf blitzer live from cairo. wolf? >>> happening now, breaking news. we're following radiation testing and fears to a new level in japan after fears of a fire and explosion at a nuclear power plant. a french official says this is getting almost as bad asscher noble, the worst nuclear plant accident ever. every day the enormity of the quake and the tsunami destruction becomes more painfully clear. it now seems likely to be the most expensive disaster in history, even worse than katrina. so how will japan handle this enormous challenge? and more than 10,000 people are dead or missing. stand by for the dramatic new video coming in and the personal stories of reunions and rescue, survival and loss. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> lots happening here. we're in egypt today, also in japan. we're following all the breaking news. cnn's isha sze say is joining us from cnn international. i've got to tell you, so much news. i've been a reporter for a long time, bu
allies meet on whether to take military action. it could happen as soon as today. >>> in japan, more fallout from the growing disaster. now there's a new threat to those who live near the nuclear reactors. we will have a live report. good morning, everyone. i'm alex witt. dramatic twists on the ground in libya and the threat of international military action. it is rapidliesque lating. this morning, shelling has been reported at the rebel stronghold of benghazi despite a cease fire gadhafi ordered on friday. renls say they shot down a pro-gadhafi fighter jet. in paris, a crisis meeting will begin shortly to detail what kind of military action the international community may take. action could begin within hours of this meeting. we have a live report from the region. >>> we have big news from japan this morning. workers are making progress as they frant ickically attempt to rebuild power lines to the reactors and hope to re-establish power at the fukushima daiichi sometime today but even if power is restored it is not clear if the cooling pumps will work. meanwhile, the japanese govern
. >> i think the events unfolding in japan incidence actually appear to be more serious than three mile island. to what extent we don't really know now. so as their unfolding very rapidly on an hour by hour, day-by-day basis and there are conflicting reports. we don't really know in detail what's happening. >> we're at a moment in time where, obviously, all of us are heartbroken by the images of what the happening in japan. we're reminded of how american leadership is critical to our closest allies even if those allies are economically advanced and powerful, there are moments when we need our help and we're bound together by a common humanity. >> all right. welcome to "morning joe." a live look at times square. it is thursday, march 17th, st. patrick's day, with us on set, pulitzer prize-winning historian, jon meacham, the chairman of deutsch incorporated, donny deutsch and columnist for "the new york times," nicholas kristof. also in washington, msnbc contributor mike barnicle. a lot going on today. japan looking graver and graver by the moment. >> certainly is. it seems, there's been
can understand that we are in the middle here in japan of what appears to be an escalating nuclear crisis and so they continue to have these rolling blackouts. we saw some power going back on behind me there at the tokyo tower, but understand that this area alone has 45 million people requiring power so they're trying to conserve as much as they can. because a quarter of the power here has been affected by the devastating earthquake and tsunami. now, you also mentioned the rescuers, the americans who were contaminated. they are pouring in rescuers from literally all around the world, at least ten different nations. they've deployed 100,000 military here in japan, and we have seen them coming in at the airport. the sad fact of the matter is that these search and rescue teams will find little to rescue, although there were a couple of amazing stories today. a baby and an elderly man pulled from the rubble after spending three nights in it. but, for the most part, what they are finding is this tremendous devastation. in one town alone, an estimated 1,000 people who were washed away in
on this site, there are life threatening doses of radiation. >> japan's emperor addressed his nation today. an extraordinary event reserved for times of war or dire national crises. he says he's touched by the japanese people's calm and order in the face of disaster. >>> well, foreigners scrambled to leave tokyo today. france is urging its citizens to get out now or at least head to southern japan. japan has lost control of fukushima. evacuees say they don't trust the japanese government to be forthcoming. >> i don't believe what i've been told. you know, people are evacuating. all foreigners are evacuating, large multi-national companies, foreign companies are evacuating. you don't really know what to believe. it's better to play it safe. >>> harrowing new video of the moments the tsunami struck. people scream as they try to outrun the water. >>> this is said to be ground zero for the tsunami. a coastal town home to 17,000 people. most are feared dead. a cnn i-reporter sent us this video at the moment the 9.0 earthquake struck. shot it at a tokyo department store. remember, tokyo is 230 m
countries like japan -- excuse me -- china and india. there is not a lot of overlap in those the use -- those views. you have an opportunity to agree with steve and me to come back where we can -- to come back to where we can get things done. you can make the case in a practical sense of what difference transit and your investment has made in your community, what difference it makes in terms of the fabric of the community, the environment, being able to deal with social equity. you have a case to make. i am proud of what we have done in portland, oregon over the last 30 years. transit made it possible for portland to be the nation's most popular european city. there is a joke about young people going there to retire. but the quality of life is good enough that people feel like they are retiring. we have an opportunity to stress in our downtown, our neighboring community. we give people transportation choices. there has been spectacular re- investment that would not have been possible had it not been for transit. we need you to advocate for what transit means to you now and what it wi
ahead. >>> good evening. i'm jenk uygur. three days after a massive earthquake and tsunami hit japan, the devastated country continued to reel today. police officials estimate more than 10,000 people were killed when one village was washed away from the tsunami-ravaged northern coast. the death toll is certain to rise. as day breaks in japan, it's a race against time to find survivors. officials say some 350,000 people are homeless and staying in shelters. as you can see the pictures there, it is absolutely devastation. you can see why there are so many people homeless. their homes are gone. emergency workers are frantically trying to cool down the reactors at the troubled fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant, located about 60 miles south of the earthquake's epicenter. there have already been two explosions at this power plant, generating from reactors one and three, first on saturday and then a second one today. today's blast injured 11 people and government authorities told people within 12 miles to stay indoors. if i was them, i would not stay indoors, i would run for the hills.
>>> choppers in the air, water cannons on the ground, japan launches an attack on a crippled nuclear reactor hoping sea water can stop an unfolding nuclear catastrophe on this "american morning." i'm christine romans. welcome to "american morning." it's march 17th, st. patrick's day. >> st. paddy's day. you are irish? >> somewhere am i irish. >> have you have green eyes. >> i'm irish. >> i'm kiran chetry. we're following the latest on japan's crisis. the focus is how to get the reactors cooled down, specifically reactor number three at fukushima's daiichi power station. military helicopters are dropping 30 tons of sea waters on the crippled reactor's pool. >> they're also spraying on the ground, up to a dozen water truxz a trucks are in place. the united states is telling americans to get at least 50 miles away from the reactor. >> there is one more critical development to watch for, engineers are planning to begin the process, which is key in this whole thing, of restoring power to the daiichi complex. they want to bring in external power lines to try to get the plant's cool
>> corn over a nuclear power plant in japan . an explosion earlier and another emergency at the same facility and just a short time on ago, a report of a big after shock. the epi center just 80 mile nuclear reactor in. i am harris fallkener. we are live tonight. losing ground in libya. rebel forces driven back. punishing attacks from the sky on our journal on the ground in the middle. >> earlier al-gaddafi attacked the town. the bomb was dropped and antiaircraft fire going up. >> fox reports from inside of libya as calls for a no fly zone. >> 14 people on board of a casino bus killed after the driver loses control. >> he struck it and the bus is tipped over at that time and cuts down the middle of the bus. >> but did another vehicle play a role. >> union protestors refusing to quit. thousands returning to the wisconsin state capitol after a crippling defeat over the collective bargaining rights. they are promising someone will pay for their loss . >> it is sunday in japan. a new danger following the tsunami and earthquake. the building at the power plant is destroyed and
and this is world business today. as radiation fears spread in japan, residents are warned to stay away from the nuclear power plant while shares in tokyo electric power sink. >>> investors kept their cash close to home. now as the region reels from protests, where will the money go next? >>> and japan airlines emerges from bankruptcy administration. we'll tell you the price it's paid. >> for now let's take you straight over to the stock market action here in europe. and we're 62 minutes into the trading day. here's how it looks right now. we are seeing modest gains right across the board. between about .25% to .6%. the dax was hit initially by the chance angela merkel has suffered a defeat. move on to the currency markets because that's affecting the euro, as well. and here we are. we're looking at 1.4074, 1.5983, just a shade under 160 for the cable. a bit of a weakness. and the japanese yen at 80.66. pauline? >>> well, charles, the markets here in asia finished mostly lower this session. the shanghai composite was the only to post gains boosted by financial stocks. uranium producers and m
-government rally. welcome to "bbc world news." coming up later, japan's nuclear safety agency raises the accident alert levels at the fukushima nuclear plant saying the situation is serious. a nation remembers. japan holds a minute of silence for those who died in the earthquake and tsunami a week ago. ♪ the u.s. president barack obama has said the libyan leader colonel gaddafi must obey the u.n. demands or face military action. earlier, the libyan government announced an immediate ceasefire and promised to follow the u.n. resolution passed on thursday. he said colonel gaddafi had to stop all attacks on civilians, pull back his troops, and allow in humanitarian aid. >> now once more, muammar gaddafi has a choice. the resolution that passed lays out very clear conditions that must be met. the united states, the united kingdom, france, and arab states agree that a cease-fire must be implemented immediately. that means all attacks against civilians must stop. gaddafi must stop his troops from advancing on benghazi. he must pull them back from misurata and established water, gas, and electricity su
provoked iran. japan is battling the devastating earthquakes, the tsunamis and fighting to keep a nuclear power plant under control. the market is tanking globally. so what is our president doing today? i mean this is the guy who told everybody rise up. the youth in the streets, look to egypt. rise up. then he promptly went off to retire to a stevie wonder private concert at the white house and then he went to play golf the saturday before last and then this saturday, and before he went to golf he gave a saturday radio address to the entire nation. he wanted to make sure that we were celebrating women's history. has somebody hit this man with a stupid stick or a tranquilizer dart? i don't, that we're celebrating women's history, emean can he look through those windows in the white house? has he become king louis? i wonder where his passion is. i like a president who is cool, but where is his passion, where is his passion for the people dieing in libya because he encouraged the youth to rise up in the streets and now we do nothing, even france is saying do something. but we do nothing. whe
east. libya tonight in particular. and japan. i want to lay out a case. i want to start with reverend wright. we know reverend wright. he was his reverend for 20 years. reverend wright is more than that. this is the guy who taught him and led him to jesus. i heard a speech a couple of years ago where the president said he had no understanding or appreciation really for jesus and the gospel. until he got it from reverend wright. now, reverend wright understands a collective salvation. the idea that you can't be redeemed or saved unless everyone is. and whatever you decide is true. that's fine for you. i'm not trying to preach religion to you. but i'm telling you that it's the exact opposite of what jesus taught. you can't find collective salvation in the gospel. it's nowhere to be found there are no ifs, ands or buts on that. none. individual salvation is universally accepted as the principal message of jesus christ. it's important because it's the antithesis of what jesus taught. we begin there. belief in collective salvation. the idea that you have to help others and you have to save
, what happened in japan, like everybody else. it's just so devastating. i can't imagine that there's going to be one agency in massachusetts who just says, you go here, you here -- i'm concerned not only in massachusetts but throughout the country if something like this happens, i'm not confident yet and i'm hopeful someone can give me the information that make sure that we all know what to do. you know? is it evacuation? is it command and control? is it military? i think it's a combination of everything. can you shed any light on my thoughts? >> in timely, i can start and then like to have an opportunity, senator brown -- >> just do that. i don't want to take the senator's time. >> i want to make one point. >> i think you're asking an important question. >> okay. >> i'd urge -- >> many of our disasters -- we always start with who's going to be the closest responders, no matter how big the disaster. it's always the local responders. we saw this, they can be destroyed, in the disaster itself. we saw this in katrina and in the tsunami. the next is the governor and their team includin
in the area around japan's damaged fukushima nuclear plant today, forcing emergency workers to temporarily abandon the facility, as tens of thousands of homeless struggled with snows and bitter cold. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on efforts to control the growing crisis in japan, including the stories of survivors and rescue crews in towns virtually wiped out by the tsunami. >> woodruff: we examine the health risks from the radiation spewing from the reactors and being carried by the wind far from japan's shores. >> ifill: plus, kwame holman looks at the u.s. nuclear energy industry in the context of japan's current crisis. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey browç updates the conflict in libya,ç as moammar qaddafi's forces move against key rebel strongholds. >> ifill: and science correspondent miles o'brien reports on nasa's next deep space ambitions, including a journey to the planet closest to the sun. >> we'll take you to mercury and beyond. you know, the solar system is not the same place you learned about in grad
in libya, across the middle east and japan. wolf in washington. two. happening right now, breaking news. president barack obama warns libyan troops and moammar gadhafi to stop attacks against civilians or face military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands o
nations takes brand new action. and here in japan the desperate effort to cool the nuclear contractor. an extension cord more than half a mile long could provide the best chance yet of prevent ago nuclear breakdown. this is breaking news now on fox news channel, i'm shepard smith. the news starts now. >> shepard: they are attacking the problem from the air and the ground. part of the effort to cool down those fuel rods and reactors. >> even as japanese responders continue to do heroic work, we know that the damage to the nuclear reactors poses a substantial risk. >> shepard: and officials say what happens in the hours ahead is absolutely critical. plus, a new move to pull americans out of the danger zone. >> i'm concerned because i really don't know the situation about the radiation. >> shepard: tonight, the escape from japan. and good friday morning from tokyo where there is breaking news at the fukushima nuclear plant. multiple reports now indicate crews have successfully hooked up an emergency power cable to one of the plant's reactors. they have call it unit 2. we are waiting for
accomplish nothing. and grappling with the new reality, japan looks for strength as the death toll climbs. >> we are following two developing stories this hour on "world report." hello, i'm fionnuala sweeney and i want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. in libya, dawn approaches this sunday morning with "operation odyssey dawn" well under way. french, u.s., and british coalition forces began hammering key libyan installations late on saturday to enforce a no-fly zone newly approved by the u.n. security council. responding to the fighter jets and cruise missiles, moammar gadhafi's defenses have been peppering libya's skies with anti-aircraft fire. here now the very latest. the pentagon saying that so far, more than 100 u.s. and british tomahawk cruise missiles have slammed into libyan targets aimed primarily at air defense systems. despite the ways of attacks libyan leader gadhafi remains defiant, condemning the coalition strikes and urging people around the world to aid in libya's defense. the british prime minister, david cameron, calls the allied effort ag
containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf
makes military decisions on libya, and watches the crisis on japan while on a diplomat i can trip to south america. so of course, republicans attack him. >> besides jewel track diplomacy. >> some of my colleagues are upset that france may be in the lead. >> tea partiers and some democrats attacked the president, calling it a possible impeachable offense. >> only congress has the power to declare war. >> we haven't declared war. >> you know what, but we are in a war. >> i really don't believe we have an obligation to get involved. >> what if this ends and gadhafi is still in power. >> outcome is unknown, political objectives are really unclear. >> and the most bitter republican presidential campaign losers attack the president. >> less dithering, more decisiveness. >> never seen a worse case of decision making. >> and finding a republican that almost conjured up the courage to say he is running for president. >> i am announcing formation of an exploratory committee for running for the president of the united states. >>> it is day three of operation dawn. the mission to enforce a un
>>> japan's nuclear nightmare growing even more desperate this morning as a cloud of smoke forms above the crippled daiichi power station, a sign that the containment vessel may have been breached. we're following the latest minute-by-minute developments on this "american morning." >>> welcome, again, thanks for being with us. >> a lot to cover this morning. in japan, the number of dead and the level of fear are rising fast. here are the latest developments in what is likely to be the costliest natural disaster the world has ever witnessed. more than 3,700 have been killed. close to 8,000 people are missing following friday's 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami. >> japanese officials fear it may have been caused by a breach in the containment vessel of reactor number three. officials are now bringing in helicopters to drop water into a cooling pond through the damaged roof of the reactor hoping to slow or stop any meltdowns. >>> for several hours last night, things grew so tense at the power plant, work was suspended and everyone there was told to evacuate. now, they've now retu
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